BLACK CHINA BLOG >> Aluminium


The following story comes from AFP.   China on Thursday defended its restrictions on the export of certain raw materials, countering accusations from the United States and Europe that the curbs amounted to trade protectionism. On Wednesday, the United States, joined by the European Union and Mexico, asked the World Trade Organization to set up […]

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The following story comes from Forbes.   Just what China needs – another new smelter…. October 30, 2009. Yunnan Metallurgical Group, the parent of Yunnan Aluminium Industry, and the government of Zhaotong city have signed an agreement to build a plant with one million tonnes a year of aluminium smelting capacity, industry and city officials said […]

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China’s primary aluminium smelters booked their highest ever production level in September, achieving 1.2 million tonnes for a daily average of just over 40,000t. The previous highest month was June 2008, pre-GFC, when China reached 39,000 tonnes per day. This level of production begs one obvious question – is demand and consumption running at the […]

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A news item from Reuters is clearly about the Russian angle, but it is also extremely interesting in relation to the China primary metal market.    In the near term, with virtually all capacity now on stream, an additonal 20,000 tonnes per month is only going to suppress the price further within China.   Underlying demand is […]

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The following article comes from AFP.   Although it’s not really any great surprise to anyone, this project has a soft spot in the heart of your humble blogger.   It was because of Alcan’s desire to reduce the capital cost of building this and future smelters, that lead Alcan to transfer me to their Beijing office.   […]

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The following article appeared in the Australian Fairfax newspaper The Age, and is one of several articles which have appeared.   The problem for Alcoa is that its electricity comes from brown coal, and is partly funded by the State.   Add to that the federal government’s plan to introduce carbon trading. The article says that Alcoa […]

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